What is green chemistry.?

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The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 established a national policy to prevent or reduce pollution at its source whenever feasible. The Pollution Prevention Act also provided an opportunity to expand beyond traditional EPA programs and devise creative strategies to protect human health and the environment. Green chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention. More specifically, green chemistry is the design of chemical
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Green chemistry or sustainable chemistry is a chemical philosophy used for the development of products and processes that eliminates & reduces  the use and generation of harmful substances,it is derived from organic,, inorganic,bio, and even physical chemistry
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Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, is a chemical philosophy encouraging the design of products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. Whereas environmental chemistry is the chemistry of the natural environment, and of pollutant chemicals in nature, green chemistry seeks to reduce and prevent pollution at its source. In 1990 the Pollution Prevention Act was passed in the United States. This act helped create a modus operandi for dealing with pollution in an original and innovative way.

As a chemical philosophy, green chemistry derives from organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry, even physical chemistry. However, the philosophy of green chemistry tends to focus on industrial applications. Contrast this with click chemistry which tends to favor academic applications, although industrial applications are possible. The focus is on minimizing the hazard and maximizing the efficiency of any chemical choice. It is distinct from environmental chemistry which focuses on chemical phenomena in the environment.

In 2005 Ryoji Noyori identified three key developments in green chemistry: use of supercritical carbon dioxide as green solvent, aqueous hydrogen peroxide for clean oxidations and the use of hydrogen in asymmetric synthesis.[1] Examples of applied green chemistry are supercritical water oxidation, on water reactions and dry media reactions.

Paul Anastas, then of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and John C. Warner developed 12 principles of green chemistry,[2] which help to explain what the definition means in practice. The principles cover such concepts as:

the design of processes to maximize the amount of raw material that ends up in the product;

the use of safe, environment-benign substances, including solvents, whenever possible;

the design of energy efficient processes;

the best form of waste disposal: do not create it in the first place.

The 12 principles are:

Prevent waste: Design chemical syntheses to prevent waste, leaving no waste to treat or clean up.

Design safer chemicals and products: Design chemical products to be fully effective, yet have little or no toxicity.

Design less hazardous chemical syntheses: Design syntheses to use and generate substances with little or no toxicity to humans and the environment.

Use renewable feedstock: Use raw materials and feedstock that are renewable rather than depleting. Renewable feedstock are often made from agricultural products or are the wastes of other processes; depleting feedstock are made from fossil fuels (petroleum, natural gas, or coal) or are mined.

Use catalysts, not stoichiometric reagents: Minimize waste by using catalytic reactions. Catalysts are used in small amounts and can carry out a single reaction many times. They are preferable to stoichiometric reagents, which are used in excess and work only once.

Avoid chemical derivatives: Avoid using blocking or protecting groups or any temporary modifications if possible. Derivatives use additional reagents and generate waste.

Maximize atom economy: Design syntheses so that the final product contains the maximum proportion of the starting materials. There should be few, if any, wasted atoms.

Use safer solvents and reaction conditions: Avoid using solvents, separation agents, or other auxiliary chemicals. If these chemicals are necessary, use innocuous chemicals. If a solvent is necessary, water is a good medium as well as certain eco-friendly solvents that do not contribute to smog formation or destroy the ozone.

Increase energy efficiency: Run chemical reactions at ambient temperature and pressure whenever possible.

Design chemicals and products to degrade after use: Design chemical products to break down to innocuous substances after use so that they do not accumulate in the environment.

Analyze in real time to prevent pollution: Include in-process real-time monitoring and control during syntheses to minimize or eliminate the formation of byproducts.

Minimize the potential for accidents: Design chemicals and their forms (solid, liquid, or gas) to minimize the potential for chemical accidents including explosions, fires, and releases to the environment.

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It also called as sustainable chemistry

As a chemical philosophy, green chemistry derives from organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry, even physical chemistry. However, the philosophy of green chemistry tends to focus on industrial applications. Contrast this with click chemistry which tends to favor academic applications, although industrial
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